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SURFACTANTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND OTHER APPLICATIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000021227D
Publication Date: 2004-Jan-06

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Jim Bushman, Browing & Bushman Patent Attorneys: ATTORNEY [+6]

Related Documents

US 2001/0009927 A1: PATAPP

Abstract

The use of branched and/or linear alcohol alkoxylate sulfates for use predominantly in environmental and cleaning applications. The surfactant can be applied in surfactant improved oil recovery (SIOR, IOR or EOR), surfactant enhance aquifer remediation (SEAR) and oil separation technology.

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SURFACTANTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND OTHER APPLICATIONS

Abstract

The use of branched and/or linear alcohol alkoxylate sulfates for use predominantly in environmental and cleaning applications. The surfactant can be applied in surfactant improved oil recovery (SIOR, IOR or EOR), surfactant enhance aquifer remediation (SEAR) and oil separation technology. The surfactant composition typically comprises application of the compounds having structure

CH3-(CH2)m - CH-(CH2)n – CH3

                 |        

                 CH2 – O – (CH2 – CH – O)x - (CH2 – CH – O )y – YM

                                 |

                                 CH3

wherein m+n is from 8 to 11, x is from 0 to 10, y is from 2 to 10, Y is a hydrophilic group, and M is a cation.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
1.         Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to surfactants compositions and, more particularly, to the surfactant compositions obtained from branched or linear alcohol and its derivatives.


2.          Description of the Prior Art

Preservation of the environment is an increasingly important aspect of conservation. It is well known that surface treatment for removal of water-insoluble, organic materials-- e.g., diesel and other fuel oils, chlorinated organics from surfaces eventually result in soil contaminants which present particularly acute problems to clean up inasmuch as typically the contaminants will permeate deeply into the soil and, if not removed, can percolate down to the water table contaminating aquifers and the like.

Numerous and mostly expensive techniques have been proposed to effect soil remediation; i.e., remove organic contaminants that have been spilled on land areas. Foremost among these techniques is thermal remediation, in which the contaminated soil is heated to a sufficiently high temperature to effectively drive off the organic pollutants from the contaminated soil. Leaching techniques have also been employed to remove the pollutants from the soil. As noted, these techniques are expensive, time-consuming and for the most part limited in that they are most suitable for land spills in which the pollutant has not penetrated too deeply below the surface. Clearly, a process that would permit recovery of organic contaminants that have permeated more deeply into the soil is greatly desired.


It is well known in the petroleum industry to use what are known as "tertiary," or "enhanced," recovery techniques to recover petroleum from a reservoir or formation that has stopped producing because of decreased formation pressure. One of the most widely used enhanced recovery techniques in the petroleum industry is what is known as "waterflooding," in which water or some other aqueous fluid is introduced through injection wells to force oil through the formation to offset producing wells. Typically, in waterflood operations, surface-active agents or surfactants are employed as part of the aqueous fluid to lower interfacial tension between the water and the formation oil, permitting oil droplets to deform, coalesce, and flow with the flood water toward the of...