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Method for sensitivity improvement via differential tunneling voltage for high-K dielectric thickness measurements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000021240D
Publication Date: 2004-Jan-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for sensitivity improvement via differential tunneling voltage for high-K dielectric thickness measurements. Benefits include improved functionality.

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Method for sensitivity improvement via differential tunneling voltage for high-K dielectric thickness measurements

Disclosed is a method for sensitivity improvement via differential tunneling voltage for high-K dielectric thickness measurements. Benefits include improved functionality.

Background

         Tunneling voltage is a function of the physical thickness of high dielectric constant, K, dielectrics. One of the problems with the conventional positive tunneling technique is that the SASS sensitivity is very low. It is approximately 8 times lower than the conventional SiO2 case.

         The differential tunneling voltage is the difference between the positive and negative tunneling voltages.

Description

         The disclosed method is sensitivity improvement via differential tunneling for high-K dielectric thickness measurements. The negative tunneling shows significant improvement (increase) for the sensitivity. However, it is approximately 4 times smaller than the sensitivity of positive tunneling for conventional SiO2-gate dielectrics. The lower sensitivity means that the same voltage drift or noise causes a larger thickness drift or variation for a high-K thickness measurement.

         The disclosed method uses the differential tunneling voltage, which gives an approximately 20% increase in the combined sensitivity (see Figure 1). This differential technique could potentially cancel out the unwanted impacts from both the positive and negative tunneling as compared to only the positive or negative tu...