Browse Prior Art Database

A LENTICULAR STEREOSCOPIC OVERLAY DEVICE FOR FLAT PANEL DISPLAYS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000021387D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Jan-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 1M

Publishing Venue

Sony Technical Digest

Related People

Thomas Patrick Dawson: INVENTOR

Abstract

The basis of this invention is to create an inexpensive overlay that can be placed over flat panel display screens (LCD screens) to create a stereoscopic image. The current means of showing stereoscopic images is expensive and requires the viewer to wear special glasses. Most current methods also require that the specific methods and equipment used to create the stereoscopic effect hold a heavy influence over the manufacture of the flat panel display. This invention, however, entails a thin plastic sheet that is placed over a flat panel display, showing stereoscopic imagery without the viewer having to wear special glasses. Though a holographic flat panel display exists today, it requires special manufacturing-the presented invention is inexpensive to manufacture and does not require special manufacturing of the flat panel display. Most importantly, current flat panel displays will work with the presented device without modifications. Finally, the device does not require the user to wear special glasses, goggles, or other headgear to obtain a stereoscopic effect .

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Sony Technical Digest, Volume 3, November 2000, ISSN 1521-5180

A LENTICULAR STEREOSCOPIC OVERLAY DEVICE FOR FLAT PANEL DISPLAYS

Invention by:

Thomas Patrick Dawson

The basis of this invention is to create an inexpensive overlay that can be placed over flat panel display screens (LCD screens) to create a stereoscopic image. The current means of showing stereoscopic images is expensive and requires the viewer to wear special glasses. Most current methods also require that the specific methods and equipment used to create the stereoscopic effect hold a heavy influence over the manufacture of the flat panel display. This invention, however, entails a thin plastic sheet that is placed over a flat panel display, showing stereoscopic imagery without the viewer having to wear special glasses. Though a holographic flat panel display exists today, it requires special manufacturing-the presented invention is inexpensive to manufacture and does not require special manufacturing of the flat panel display. Most importantly, current flat panel displays will work with the presented device without modifications. Finally, the device does not require the user to wear special glasses, goggles, or other headgear to obtain a stereoscopic effect .

The outer facing portion of the sheet would be made from clear molded resin, with the width and thickness of the columns being modified to the flat panel display that it was intended to be used with. Alternatively, given that flat panel displays are made...