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Browse Prior Art Database

RATION DAMPING SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000021389D
Original Publication Date: 2000-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Jan-16
Document File: 1 page(s) / 247K

Publishing Venue

Sony Technical Digest

Related People

Paul Jaynes: INVENTOR

Abstract

The common apartment or condominium has thin walls and ceilings that do not dampen audio transmissions very well, resulting in many noise complaints when the upstairs neighbor plays the stereo too loud. The source of the problem is the transmission of audio pressure/vibration waves from the speakers to the wall or the floor.

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Sony Technical Digest, Volume 3, November 2000, ISSN 1521-5180

RATION DAMPING SYSTEM

Invention by: Paul Jaynes

The common apartment or condominium has thin walls and ceilings that do not dampen audio transmissions very well, resulting in many noise complaints when the upstairs neighbor plays the stereo too loud. The source of the problem is the transmission of audio pressure/vibration waves from the speakers to the wall or the floor.

To solve the problem of noise transmission, this invention introduces a false speaker base composed of a series of rubber gaskets filled with audio dampening material, possibly gel. The speaker vibration would be partially damped by the gaskets through dissipating the energy with the gel motion and the rubber's counteracting motion. The theory of this gasket system can be thought of as a shock absorber for mechanical vibrations that are produced by the airflow in a speaker.

The "Best Mode" would have to be determined by vibration analysis. The design and form of the gasket, and the elasticity and viscosity of the rubber and gel respectively, would 011 have to be determined by experimentation. Without the use of computerized vibration analysis software, it would take a very long time to find the best material and design for this dampening system. If vibration analysis software is used to facilitate this experimentation, optimization is likely to be achieved.

Sony Technical Digest, Volume 3 Page 51