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Method for a venturi-cooled heatsink with vortex spot cooling and directed exhaust on a die substrate package

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000021634D
Publication Date: 2004-Jan-28
Document File: 4 page(s) / 102K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for venturi-cooled heatsink with vortex spot cooling and directed exhaust on a die substrate package. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, and improved reliability.

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Method for a venturi-cooled heatsink with vortex spot cooling and directed exhaust on a die substrate package

Disclosed is a method for venturi-cooled heatsink with vortex spot cooling and directed exhaust on a die substrate package. Benefits include improved functionality, improved performance, and improved reliability.

Background

Efficient and cost effective cooling and heat dissipation is required for semiconductor devices. Conventionally, most commercial computers and servers use ambient air cooling with a fan or forced air and a large heatsink attached to the die/substrate package. The temperature delivered to the semiconductor device is never below ambient (room) temperature. In some business applications, refrigerated or air conditioned air is also used. However, the air temperature is seldom below the 45-55˚F range. Other large industrial computers and servers utilize heatsinks as well, which additionally employ very expensive liquid or cryogenic cooling. These solutions are inefficient, require a lot of maintenance and monitoring, or are too cost prohibitive for commercial use (see Figure 1).

The cooling effects of existing, off the shelf vortex generators have been well established and in use for many years, coupled with heatsink designs and the use of dry compressed air to create an inert environment. Venturi nozzle designs also have been in use for many years, most notably in the automotive and machining industry where concentrated spot air cooling is frequently required. The use of pressurized dry air to dessicate and remove dust particles is well understood. Conventional heatsinks have been shown to enhance external cooling, typically in the form of fans.

General description

The disclosed method is heatsink cooling for a semiconductor die mounted package using a low temperature vortex cooling generator tube with venture-nozzle air focus for pinpoint cooling on the package. The method uses multiple lid-to-heatsink chimneys which function as a contact physical heatsink column and a warm air dissipating conduit, exhausting the warm air dissipated by the die. The heat is removed convectively and conductively while cooling the heatsink, which

can be tapped to accommodate one or more vortex generators-venturi combinations for large die or extreme heat removal.

The vortex cooler is under 20-60 psi and at 76˚F (room temperature) and is quite capable of output temperature drops of 28-51˚F. The cooler acts as an adjustable air amplifier. When used in conjunction with a venturi-type nozzle, a very efficient air flow can be created that has a funnel like, directed airflow with a pinpoint spot location (much like a whirlpool effect). The method concentrates a higher flow of dry, near freezing cool air directly at the hottest spot of the die.

The heatsink is hollow and has fins to radiate stored heat. The heatsink is made of copper or other heat dissipation-efficient metal. Because the heatsink is hollow, it acts as a self-cooling chute wi...