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PROCESS FOR CONTROLLING EXCESSIVE ALGAL GROWTH IN SURFACE WATER BODIES THAT ARE SOURCES OF POTABLE WATER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000021691D
Publication Date: 2004-Feb-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Solutions of alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride, ("quat") can inhibit and prevent the growth of algae and thus also reduces the organic loading in untreated water bodies. The addition of quat prevents the growth of algae and thus reduces the ultimate formation of the carcinogenic THM's in subsequent chlorination.

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process for controlling excessive algal growth in surface water bodies that are sources of potable water

Abstract

Solutions of alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride, (“quat”) can inhibit and prevent the growth of algae and thus also reduces the organic loading in untreated water bodies. The addition of quat prevents the growth of algae and thus reduces the ultimate formation of the carcinogenic THM’s in subsequent chlorination.

Description

Algae commonly infests and grows in bodies of water, particularly water exposed to the sun or other sources of light. The problem of algae growth affects swimming pools, spas, lakes, rivers, reservoirs, industrial water systems, and other bodies of water. The resolution of the algae growth problems in each of these different water bodies requires different control methods; control methods for one water body are typically not suitable for a different water body. Means for control must be tailored for each water body.

Algae growth is particularly a problem in warm periods, when the water temperature is relatively high and the concentration of nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate in the water increases.

Open water bodies, whether natural (lakes, ponds, etc) or man made (specifically designed and constructed reservoirs) are particularly subject to algae growth due to naturally occurring nutrients that come from bird and other animal waste, decaying plant life, microbial growth, and exposure to sunlight.

Open bodies of slow moving water or still water such as lakes, ponds, and reservoirs may have algae blooms, particularly when there are nutrients in the water and adequate sunlight. When the algae growth is excessive, significant fouling and clogging of the water body can occur. As the growth continues, a portion of the algae dies and begins a decay process, which further uses up available oxygen in the water, inhibiting the growth or killing desirable fish and plant life. The decaying organic matter sinks and prevents sunlight from penetrating the water and promoting desirable plant life. When water with this decaying organic matter is withdrawn for potable water use, it is treated to remove solids and disinfected to insure no pathogenic organisms enter the distribution system. When the decayed or...