Browse Prior Art Database

Biometric Chop

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000021710D
Publication Date: 2004-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that uses a digital "chop" with built-in biometric sensing capabilities that can imprint digital radio identification tags onto paper, as well as leave an ink imprint. This idea comes from the Chinese tradition of using a chop—or stamp—to authorize a document. Benefits include a secure intermediary step toward the digitization of paper documents.

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Biometric Chop

Disclosed is a method that uses a digital “chop” with built-in biometric sensing capabilities that can imprint digital radio identification tags onto paper, as well as leave an ink imprint. This idea comes from the Chinese tradition of using a chop—or stamp—to authorize a document. Benefits include a secure intermediary step toward the digitization of paper documents.

Background

Currently when authorizing a document, the chop is removed from a safe and an authorizing person uses the chop to stamp the document (see Figure 1).

General Description

The disclosed method’s digital chop has a biometric sensor incorporated into it so that only authorized individuals can use it. If an unapproved person attempts to the use the device, the surface of the paper remains in a neutral, “off” state. The chop produces a time-stamped, ID-stamped digital record of the authorization event and records the nature of the document by incorporating a sensor (i.e. a camera, or radio-frequency identification [RF-ID] reader) into the chop; this records features of the paper document (e.g. the visual appearance, or data from the RF-ID tags embedded in it). The resulting digital record is uploaded to a central database via physical docking or wireless connectivity, and can alter the physical inked imprint left by the chop (e.g. showing the time, date, location, and ID of the person making the imprint).

Access to a chop can be enforced by a central authority. Although digital...