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Method for a multicomponent heatsink with an internal cavity waveguide

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000021728D
Publication Date: 2004-Feb-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 486K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a multicomponent heatsink with an internal cavity waveguide. Benefits include improved functionality and improved performance.

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Method for a multicomponent heatsink with an internal cavity waveguide

Disclosed is a method for a multicomponent heatsink with an internal cavity waveguide. Benefits include improved functionality and improved performance.

Background

         Computing platforms are trending towards higher operating speeds and larger thermal loads. This trend is particularly predominant for the central processing unit (CPU) and memory controller hub (MCH) components. The front-side bus (FSB) or front-side interface (FSI) transmits between these components at data rates approaching and surpassing 10 billion transactions per second (GT/s). Both the MCH and CPU require thermal solutions, such as heatsinks, to maintain tolerable component operating temperatures (see Figure 1).

         Typical motherboard technologies make use of microstrip or strip-line transmission lines for FSB/FSI signal propagation. Thermal solutions use passive heatsinks made of machined aluminum. In some cases, active cooling, such as refrigeration or liquid cooling, is required for high-performance CPUs, adding considerable expense to the system cost.

General description

         The disclosed method is a metallic heatsink with an internal cavity waveguide. The heatsink is large enough to accommodate multiple components, such as ball grid array (BGA) packages and sockets, under its footprint. The cavity waveguide (WG) inside the heatsink supports the transmission of electromagnetic (EM) signals, such as radio frequency (RF) or microwave, between electronic components beneath the heatsink.

         The heatsink can be made of machined aluminum or any other thermally conductive metal. The heatsink can have multiple fins or an expansive surface area to maximize heat dissipation. An appropriate retention mechanism is used to attach the heatsink to the motherboard. The cavity has openings to the underside of the heatsink. These openings align to antenna structures on the electronic components that transmit and receive the EM signals. The dimensions of the internal cavity WG, determines the frequency range (cut-off frequency) and modes of the transmitted signal.

Advantages

         The disclosed method provides advantages, including:

•         Improved functionality due to enabling a more robust high-speed signaling technology by using RF or microwave carriers inside a cavity WG

•         Improved performance due to supporting a larger thermal solution that enables higher speed CPUs to dissipate more heat

Detailed description

         The disclosed method consolidates signal and thermal solutions into a si...