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Dual Isolated High Frequency Probe

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000021734D
Publication Date: 2004-Feb-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a high frequency controlled impedance probe that contains two independent RF microprobes in a fixed position; a ground shield is included between the microprobes to reduce internal probe-to-probe coupling. Benefits include a solution that is more accurate, with a broader measurement capability.

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Dual Isolated High Frequency Probe

Disclosed is a method for a high frequency controlled impedance probe that contains two independent RF microprobes in a fixed position; a ground shield is included between the microprobes to reduce internal probe-to-probe coupling. Benefits include a solution that is more accurate, with a broader measurement capability.

Background

Currently, devices with very low impedance (i.e. package capacitors) are measured using two microprobes that are not in a fixed position relative to each other (see Figure 1). Generally these microprobes are placed on independent mounts, and because the microprobes can move independently, the coupling between these probes varies with each probe movement. This variability prevents the measurement artifacts of non-ideal couplings from being mathematically removed during the vector network analyzer (VNA) calibration procedure. Without the mathematical compensation, the measurement range and accuracy is limited.

General Description

The disclosed method improves microprobe measurements by removing the variability that would normally limit the microprobe calibration. Two Ground-Signal (GS) or Ground-Signal-Ground (GSG) microprobes are contained in one probe unit, which maintains the relative position of these microprobes relative to each other. This unit also contains a ground shield between the probes to reduce probe coupling (see Figure 2). The probe unit contains mounting holes to allow the unit to be attached to a s...