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Enhanced Nucleate Boiling Surface Used at the Pumped Fluid Loop for the Cooling of CPUs in Computers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000022130D
Publication Date: 2004-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for an enhanced nucleate boiling surface used in the evaporator section of the pumped fluid loop. Benefits include improving evaporative heat transfer when cooling high-performance CPUs in mobile computers.

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Enhanced Nucleate Boiling Surface Used at the Pumped Fluid Loop for the Cooling of CPUs in Computers

Disclosed is a method for an enhanced nucleate boiling surface used in the evaporator section of the pumped fluid loop. Benefits include improving evaporative heat transfer when cooling high-performance CPUs in mobile computers.

Background

Currently, the cooling of CPUs in mobile computers is accomplished using conventional heat pipe technology. Figure 1 shows a typical pumped fluid loop.

General Description

Compared with conventional heat pipe technology, a pumped, two-phase fluid loop is a promising method to manage thermal issues for next-generation mobile CPUs. The benefits to this approach are low evaporative thermal resistances and high heat carrying capacities. The disclosed method uses a surface enhancement method (e.g., a porous structure) on top of the evaporator, so that the evaporative resistance is significantly reduced. Figures 2 and 3, show enhanced nucleate boiling surfaces for two different evaporator designs (bare die and cold plate, respectively).

Recent literature points out that with certain surface enhancements and structures with characteristic dimensions of ~300 microns, one can accomplish nucleate boiling with only 2-3 oC superheat (i.e. at 100-200 W/cm2 heat flux), which results in an evaporation resistance of ~ 0.04-0.06 oC/W resistance for 1 cm2 heat source. The surface enhancement technology (e.g., sintering, electro-plating, spray-coating) can ea...