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Method for "Deleting" Voices from and Audio Channel

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000022233D
Publication Date: 2004-Mar-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Kim Annon Ryal: INVENTOR

Abstract

Use the Dolby down mix capability to remove voices (tracks) from an audio channel. This allows a person learning to play an instrument to play along with established bands.

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Sony Corporation

Sony Electronics Inc.

IPD Case #50T5582

Title:

Method for “Deleting” Voices from and Audio Channel

Abstract:

Use the Dolby down mix capability to remove voices (tracks) from an audio channel. This allows a person learning to play an instrument to play along with established bands.

Inventor:

Kim Annon Ryal

Description of the Invention:

1.      My brother-in-law was an (unskilled, but enthusiastic) amateur drummer. He had a series of records "X Without a Drummer" that would allow him to play along with various Big Band groups (I'm dating myself by mentioning that these were 78 RPM vinyl). I always thought this was a cool idea and could be expanded to include other instrument voices: Aerosmith without a lead guitar, or the Doors without a keyboard, etc.

While going through the karaoke section of DVD I found that they are already doing something similar, allowing vocal tracts to be eliminated and replaced.

2.      Record each instrument (for rock bands, this is almost trivial: lead guitar, rhythm guitar, bass guitar, drums, lead vocals, background vocals, etc.) as a separate track. The whole composition grouped into an audio channel (Broadcom's decoder, for example, permits this) and down-mixed to L/R output.

By selectively deleting a single track, the composition can be left without the voice of the instrument you are trying to learn to play, allowing you to play along.

By providing microphone input (as karaoke DVD players do), you can add your instrument's voice to...