Browse Prior Art Database

Method for a wave-solder hole-fill dummy test component

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000022268D
Publication Date: 2004-Mar-03
Document File: 4 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a wave-solder hole-fill dummy test component. Benefits include improved functionality and improved yield.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Method for a wave-solder hole-fill dummy test component

Disclosed is a method for a wave-solder hole-fill dummy test component. Benefits include improved functionality and improved yield.

Background

It is very difficult to determine the percentage of the hole fill on through-hole mount components. Most through-hole components block the top of the hole from view. New lead-free manufacturing processes are more susceptible to low-percentage hole filling than previous tin-lead (SnPb) wave-solder processes (see Figure 1).

The two prominent conventional solutions are cross sectioning and visual inspection. Cross sectioning is destructive and does not provide instant feedback to changes in the wave-solder bath parameters. This solution cannot be used in high-volume manufacturing (see Figure 2).

Visual inspection is subjective and only works for components in which the top of the hole is visible. To make the solder easier to see, percentage hole-fill guidelines are typically set at a level higher than is known to provide good solder joints. As a result, some otherwise good boards are rejected.

         The use of an alternating conductive/non-conductive electrical lead to provide multiple independent signal paths on a single lead is standard in audio jacks.

General description

The disclosed method is a dummy test component assembled on a functional electronic circuit board, which enables the board assembler to determine the hole-fill percentage without destructive testing.

The method uses a dummy through-hole component comprised of one through-hole lead with alternating layers of conductive and nonconductive material. These alternating layers result in progressively more electrical circuits as solder flows deeper into the solder hole. The device includes multiple light-emitting...