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Method For Determining the Physical Location of Affected Hardware or Software Denoted in a Systems Management Event

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000022356D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Mar-10
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for determining the exact physical location of the affected hardware or software that is denoted in a systems management event. This invention aids in determining the root cause and the patterns of events across geographical locations. It does this by correlating systems management problems with the exact geographical location where they originate and visually presenting the correlated information to operators.

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Method For Determining the Physical Location of Affected Hardware or Software Denoted in a Systems Management Event

Today, in systems management, there is no quick and easy way to determine the exact physical location of the affected hardware or software that is denoted in an event. Therefore, there is no quick and easy way to see and respond to system-, network-, application-, or security-related patterns occurring within or across physical locations such as a buildings, cities, states or provinces, countries, or continents. Generally we know an event came from a specific host but we do not have any idea where that host is located physically.

This invention assumes that all critical computers and computing devices in an enterprise are equipped with Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers.

It improves or enhances event management (including management of system-, network-, application-, and security-related events) by providing--within an event--the physical location data (GPS coordinates) of the computer or computing device where the event originates. For example, if the event originates with software, the event would include the GPS coordinates of the computer on which the software resides. If the event originates with hardware (for example, a "router down" event), it would include the GPS coordinates of the hardware device (router in this case).

The GPS coordinates could be included in an event (in the same way as other event data). This would allow the corr...