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Method and System to Measure and Track Productivity Rates in Product Documentation Development

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000022358D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Mar-10
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This process document describes a new way of measuring and tracking information development work as it is created. By using this method, it is possible to measure progress, workload, and changes on a weekly or (if required) daily basis. If the product schedule gets off track due to changes or other difficulties, the problem will quickly become apparent, often early enough to correct it.

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Method and System to Measure and Track Productivity Rates in Product Documentation Development

The development of product documentation is difficult to measure. The traditional way to manage large code development projects is to start with a base release of the product, and add subsequent changes, called "line items" or components, to the base code. These components are sized and tracked to completion, so progress is shown, but translating this progress into productivity rates, either by group or individual, is difficult. This method also does not measure or reflect the inevitable change and increased workload that is introduced during the product development cycle.

This process document describes a new way of measuring and tracking information development work as it is created. By using this method, it is possible to measure progress, workload, and changes on a weekly or (if required) daily basis. If the product schedule gets off track due to changes or other difficulties, the problem will quickly become apparent, often early enough to correct it.

The measurement process starts during the documentation sizing stage, which is very early in the release. The components typically fall into several size categories: very small, small, medium, medium-large, large, huge. Each of the size categories is given a number, with an increment of fifty for each step up. Very small is 50, small is 100, medium is 150, and so forth. The increment allows assigning a value for a fine...