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Emotion sensing keyboard and software

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000022371D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Mar-11
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-11
Document File: 1 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This publication describes a specialized keyboard and associated software capable of measuring and reacting to user emotion based on typing style.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 78% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Emotion sensing keyboard and software

Proposed is a way to deter a user from sending a quick, emotionally driven, improper response to an email. For example, if a user is angry in response to an email received, the user may write an email back without much thought and later regret sending the email. Emotionally driven emails can cause serious problems in a work environment. Currently there is not a way to prevent this from happening.

When the problem mentioned above happens, the user almost always hits the keys on the keyboard harder when replying with the offensive email. We propose a solution consisting of hardware and software that would sense when the keys are hit harder than normal by the user, and would take some configured action as a result. For example, it could save the email as a draft, and present it to the user after an hour with the option to send, revise, or delete. It could play soothing music in response or notify the user in some other way as a response to the frantic typing to let them know they may want to take a few deep breaths before continuing.

In addition to sending emails, this could be applied to sending instant messages. An action could be taken in response to frantic typing of a message.

The software proposed by this invention would have to
1. Sense when the keys are hit harder than usual. This requires having the ability to determine how hard the keys are hit. This technology exists, for example, in touch sensitive electronic pianos....