Browse Prior Art Database

Modified Memory Module Outline for Thermal Enhancement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000022641D
Published in the IP.com Journal: Volume 4 Issue 4 (2004-04-25)
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 143K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

High power dissipation devices on memory modules often cause problems with the thermal management on module and system level. These devices emit such a significant amount of thermal energy to the memory board that overheating and functional failures in the surrounding memory components may occur (Figure 1). Due to dimensional restrictions on the memory board, passive heat removal functions are not sufficient to dissipate the power into the surrounding ambient air flow. Today, memory modules dissipate their power either through the PCB (Printed Circuit Board) via the socket connection to the mother board or to the ambient airflow (Figure 2). The power dissipation via the mother board is restricted by the thermal conductivity of the module's PCB (layer construction) and socket. Furthermore, other power dissipating elements surrounding the memory module, e.g. neighboring modules or processors, affect the ability of the mother board to act as a heat sink, and this is also dependent on the performance of the fan system and the arrangement of the modules within the air stream. Solutions including sheet metals which are directly attached to the memory modules have been proposed, but these incorporate the problem that the heat sinks are not directly exposed to the airflow when build in back-to-back into the application and, thus, the heat spreading effect is limited. Furthermore this solutions induce a thermal cross coupling effect between the problematic devices and the memory components. Separation of the high power dissipation devices from the memory components lowers the direct coupling effect, but an effective thermal dissipation solution for these devices has not yet been indicated (Figure 3).

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

S

Modified Memory Module Outline for Thermal Enhancement

Idea: Juergen Hoegerl, DE-Regensburg; Gerold Gruendler; DE-Regensburg; Volker Strutz, DE-Regensburg; Erich Syri, DE-Regensburg

High power dissipation devices on memory modules often cause problems with the thermal management on module and system level. These devices emit such a significant amount of thermal energy to the memory board that overheating and functional failures in the surrounding memory components may occur (Figure 1). Due to dimensional restrictions on the memory board, passive heat removal functions are not sufficient to dissipate the power into the surrounding ambient air flow.

Today, memory modules dissipate their power either through the PCB (Printed Circuit Board) via the socket connection to the mother board or to the ambient airflow (Figure 2). The power dissipation via the mother board is restricted by the thermal conductivity of the module's PCB (layer construction) and socket. Furthermore, other power dissipating elements surrounding the memory module, e.g. neighboring modules or processors, affect the ability of the mother board to act as a heat sink, and this is also dependent on the performance of the fan system and the arrangement of the modules within the air stream. Solutions including sheet metals which are directly attached to the memory modules have been proposed, but these incorporate the problem that the heat sinks are not directly exposed to the airflow when build in back-to-back into the application and, thus, the heat spreading effect is limited. Furthermore this solutions induce a thermal cross cou...