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BORATE CLEANING COMPOSITION FOR ALUMINUM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000022842D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Mar-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 217K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A number of metal cleaners are known for cleaning and processing aluminum and aluminum alloys. Such materials are based primarily on sodium hydroxide1 sodium carbonate and/or sodium bicarbonate. Such cleaners, however1 suffer from the disadvantage of being sensitive to a lower pI~ resulting in a short lived cleaning bath. Maintenance of a high pI-I~ on the other hand, sometimes results in an undesirable strong etching effect. Control of a stable bath is further complicated in the use of cleaning compositions by the fact that additives such as detergents sometimes require corrosion inhibitors such as arsenic and antimony salts which can also create toxicological problems. Such problems can be avoided by utilizing a metal cleaning and oxide removing bath containing about 0.5% 15% by weight of at least one component providing carbonate ions; about 0.5% 15% by weight of at least one components providing borate ions; and up to about 1% by weight and preferably 0.1% 1% by weight of at least one surfactant, the balance of the bath comprising water (preferably deionized) or an alcohol solution including a straight or branched lower carbon alcohol such as 1-8 carbon atoms exemplified by aqueous methanol, ethanol, isopropanol and octanol solutions.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

BORATE CLEANING Proposed Classification
COMPOSITION FOR ALUMINUM U.S. CL 252/156
D,J, Angelini mt. Cl. Cud 7/06

A number of metal cleaners are known for cleaning and
processing aluminum and aluminum alloys. Such materials are based primarily on sodium hydroxide

                           1 sodium carbonate and/or sodium bicarbonate. Such cleaners, however

                                       1 suffer
from the disadvantage of being sensitive to a lower pI~ resulting in a short lived cleaning bath. Maintenance of
a high pI-I~ on the other hand, sometimes results in an
undesirable strong etching effect. Control of a stable
bath is further complicated in the use of cleaning
compositions by the fact that additives such as detergents
sometimes require corrosion inhibitors such as arsenic and
antimony salts which can also create toxicological
problems. Such problems can be avoided by utilizing a
metal cleaning and oxide removing bath containing about
0.5% 15% by weight of at least one component providing carbonate ions; about 0.5% 15% by weight of at least one
components providing borate ions; and up to about 1% by
weight and preferably 0.1% 1% by weight of at least one
surfactant, the balance of the bath comprising water
(preferably deionized) or an alcohol solution including a
straight or branched lower carbon alcohol such as 1-8
carbon atoms exemplified by aqueous methanol, ethanol,
isopropanol and octanol solutions.

Volume 3. Number 3 March 1976 67

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68 XEROX...