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ULTRA-VIOLET CURABLE LIQUID IMMERSION DEVELOPMENT TONER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000022976D
Original Publication Date: 1976-May-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 188K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

This disclosure deals with a liquid immersion development process. Prior liquid immersion development processes using organosol toners have problems of solvent extraction and recovery. It is proposed that this problem be circumvented by the use of a solventless toner consisting of a viscous ultra-violet curable liquid polymer to provide the tackiness for transfer to paper, The viscous toner is dispersed in a carrier fluid and developed in the conventional way. After transfer the print is exposed to ultra-violet light to con- vert the liquid toner into a non-tacky solid. The carrier fluid is evaporated from the photoreceptor surface by warm air and condensed within the copying machine, The ultra- violet curable polymer is then transferred to paper and fixed by exposure to ultra-violet radiation, In this way, only one solvent recovery process is needed and solvent recovery is from the photoreceptor surface rather than the more difficult recovery of solvent which has been absorbed i~ito the paper,

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Page 1 of 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

ULTRA-VIOLET CURABLE LIQUID Proposed Classification
IMMERSION DEVELOPMENT TONER U.S. CL 252/62,1
C. C, Chow mt. Cl. G03g 9/00

This disclosure deals with a liquid immersion development
process. Prior liquid immersion development processes using
organosol toners have problems of solvent extraction and
recovery. It is proposed that this problem be circumvented
by the use of a solventless toner consisting of a viscous
ultra-violet curable liquid polymer to provide the tackiness
for transfer to paper, The viscous toner is dispersed in a
carrier fluid and developed in the conventional way. After
transfer the print is exposed to ultra-violet light to con-
vert the liquid toner into a non-tacky solid. The carrier
fluid is evaporated from the photoreceptor surface by warm
air and condensed within the copying machine, The ultra-
violet curable polymer is then transferred to paper and
fixed by exposure to ultra-violet radiation, In this way,
only one solvent recovery process is needed and solvent
recovery is from the photoreceptor surface rather than the
more difficult recovery of solvent which has been absorbed
i~ito the paper,

Volume 1 Number 5 May 1976 49

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50 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

Volume 1 Number 5 May 1976

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]