Browse Prior Art Database

LIQUID CRYSTAL ALIGNMENT CHANNELS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000023263D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 243K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Optimum optical properties in liquid crystal devices depend on uniform alignment of the molecules within the cell. By merely rubbing a substrate upon which a liquid crystalline material is to reside, non-precise alignment is achieved. Improved alignment has been provided by the use of surface coated chern-ical surfactants and silicone monoxide films vacuum deposited in an oblique fashion onto the substrate.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

LIQUID CRYSTAL ALIGNMENT CHANNELS Proposed Classification
Kyle~r F. Nelson u.s. ci. 350/160Lc
mt. Cl. G02b 5/23

Optimum optical properties in liquid crystal devices depend on
uniform alignment of the molecules within the cell. By merely
rubbing a substrate upon which a liquid crystalline material
is to reside, non-precise alignment is achieved. Improved
alignment has been provided by the use of surface coated chern-
ical surfactants and silicone monoxide films vacuum deposited
in an oblique fashion onto the substrate.

To provide an even more precise alignment, it is proposed to
construct alignment channels on the substrate through use of
very high resolution (greater than 500 line pairs per milli-
meter) photoresist materials developed for modern printed cir-
cuit technology.

The photoresist material is coated upon the substrate; exposed
to actinic radiation through a Ronchi ruling; and developed to

leave uniform, parallel rectangles of photoresist on the sub-
strate forming ridges of photoresist material and valleys of
substrate surface. A suitable material (insulating for insul-
ating substrates, optionally conducting for conducting sub-
strates) is vacuum deposited over the photoresist pattern at a
thickness substantially less than that of the photoresist
ridges (for example, about 400 A. thick for vacuum deposited
aluminum) . The photoresist is washed away in a suitable sol-
vent, leaving behind the substrate with vacuum deposited

material thereon, formin...