Browse Prior Art Database

CYCLING PROCESS TO ALLEVIATE "MACHINE AGING" PROBLEM FOR GEOMETRICALLY CONTROLLED PHOTORECEPTOR LAYERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000023361D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 188K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A process is disclosed for minimizing or elimihating the "machine aging" problem in the Continuous cycling process of a geometrically controlled photoreceptor such as disclosed in U.S. Patents 3,787,208 and 3,981,728. This "machine aging" problem results in high background voltage and low contrast after the photoreceptor layer has been machine cycled for 1000 or more times. The proposed process involves incorporating a heat lamp of proper frequency and intensity either immediately before or immediately after the erase lamp to provide the thermal energy required to restore the electrical properties to a geometrically controlled photoreceptor layer. Ambient resting for a period of 24 hours did not significantly improve the photoreceptor's performance. However, thermal treatment at 60┬░Crestored the photoreceptor's original electrical prop-erties.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

CYCLING PROCESS TO ALLEVIATE Proposed Classification
"MACHINE AGING" PROBLEM FOR U.S. Cl. 96/1.5
GEOMETRICALLY CONTROLLED mt Cl G03g 5/04
PHOTORECEPTOR LAYERS
Samuel J. ~ackling
Chi-Yuan Ling

A process is disclosed for minimizing or elimihating the
"machine aging" problem in the Continuous cycling process of a
geometrically controlled photoreceptor such as disclosed in
U.S. Patents 3,787,208 and 3,981,728. This "machine aging"
problem results in high background voltage and low contrast
after the photoreceptor layer has been machine cycled for 1000
or more times. The proposed process involves incorporating a
heat lamp of proper frequency and intensity either immediately
before or immediately after the erase lamp to provide the
thermal energy required to restore the electrical properties
to a geometrically controlled photoreceptor layer. Ambient
resting for a period of 24 hours did not significantly improve
the photoreceptor's performance. However, thermal treatment
at 60°Crestored the photoreceptor's original electrical prop-
erties.

Volume 2 Number 4 July/August 1977 11

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 2

LL61 ;snbny/Atnr Tv iaquxn~ a B1]IfltOA at

'IVMUflQL' 2~flSOt9ia XOH2X

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]