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IMAGING BY REVERSIBLE CONVERSION FROM DYE TO PIGMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000023495D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 276K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

An imaging process and a display device which comprises a film coating or cast film of a polymer and a colorant is disclosed. The colorant can exist either as a dye or pigment when the polymer is in the solid states The coating will form a more opaque body when the colorant is a pigment; whereas when the colorant is in the dye state the body is substantially trans-parent. Imaging is achieved in a body of initial opaque material by converting the body to a transparent state in pattern configuration. If the initial body is transparent, imaging is achieved by causing the body to be opaque, that is, by causing the colorant to be in the pigment form. The color-

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

IMAGING BY REVERSIBLE CONVERSION Proposed Classification
FROM DYE TO PIGMENT U~S, CL 428/29
Joseph Mammino Into CL B44f 1/10

An imaging process and a display device which comprises a film
coating or cast film of a polymer and a colorant is disclosed.

The colorant can exist either as a dye or pigment when the
polymer is in the solid states The coating will form a more
opaque body when the colorant is a pigment; whereas when the
colorant is in the dye state the body is substantially trans-
parent. Imaging is achieved in a body of initial opaque
material by converting the body to a transparent state in
pattern configuration. If the initial body is transparent,
imaging is achieved by causing the body to be opaque, that is,
by causing the colorant to be in the pigment form. The color-

ant change from a dye (soluble in the polymer) to pigment
(insoluble in the polymer) and vice versa in the coating can
be accomplished by contacting the member with appropriate
solvents or subjecting the member to temperature gradient.
Suitable polymeric materials may be selected from the broad
class of polyester polymers, polyamides, polyacrylonitrile and
chemically modified cellulose polymers and blends of the
above~ They may be used either as coating polymers or cast as
film substrates. Suitable colorants may be selected from the
class of disperse dyes. Typical disperse dyes are Disperse
Yellow 33, Disperse Red 5, Disperse Blue 11 and others dis-
cussed in the Colour Index , 3rd Ed...