Browse Prior Art Database

REMOTE DIAGNOSTICS SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000023611D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 404K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

The monthly telephone company charges and installation costs for a dedicated telephone line tied directly to each copier are disadvantageous for a remote diagnostics system. This alternative system would use an audio tape cassette unit associated with each copier. The taped data would be removed from the copier and played back to the remote diagnostics center location over an existing customer telephone line.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

REMOTE DIAGNOSTICS SYSTEM Proposed Classification
Paul F. Morgan u.s. Cl. 355/3
tnt. Cl. G03g 15/00

The monthly telephone company charges and installation costs
for a dedicated telephone line tied directly to each copier
are disadvantageous for a remote diagnostics system. This
alternative system would use an audio tape cassette unit
associated with each copier. The taped data would be removed
from the copier and played back to the remote diagnostics
center location over an existing customer telephone line.

Continuously or upon the actuation of a key operator diag-
nostics button, the copier interrogates its condition through
its internal diagnostics logic and records all of this
information within a few seconds on the tape cassette through
conventional circuitry converting the machine logic states
into a series of audio tone signals. Then the tape cassette is
removed from the copier by the key operator and carried to a
conventional cassette play-back unit and modem (accoustic
coupler) associated with an existing telephone. Alterna-
tively, the entire mini-cassette unit is simply unplugged from
the copier, carried over to the nearest telephone, and its
speaker placed against the telephone mouthpiece. upon the
telephone request of the remotely located technical represent-
ative, the key operator would start the cassette player to
play back the series of diagnostic audio tone signals recorded
on the tape. Alternatively, the technical representative
computer console or mini-computer terminal at the diagnostic
center could send a tone or code signal to automatically...