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Browse Prior Art Database

REMOTE METER READING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000023612D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 558K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

This is a system for the transmission of office machinĂ³ metering information from a customer site to a central data processing location for storage, processing and customer billing. A key point is to have centralized customer counting registers, which are not part of the individual office machines, but which are located in a separate, free-standing device, which communicates with a number of copiers or other office machines used by that same customer.

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I

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

REMOTE METER READING Proposed Classification
John L. Wheeler u.s. Cl. 355/3
mt. Cl. G03g 15/00

This is a system for the transmission of office machinó
metering information from a customer site to a central data
processing location for storage, processing and customer
billing.

A key point is to have centralized customer counting
registers, which are not part of the individual office
machines, but which are located in a separate, free-standing
device, which communicates with a number of copiers or other
office machines used by that same customer.

Each individual office machine would normally contain one or
more registers to keep count of the various operations within
it. This would include usage (copy counts, etc.) and desired
machine diagnostics information. The central concentrator
registers may contain one register or counter for each of the
counting functions normally contained within the separate
office machines. Whenever a counting operation takes place in
an office machine or at periodic or interrogated intervals,
inipulses are transmitted to the central concentrator
registers. The appropriate register is incremented and the
new count stored. The concentrator registers may be connected
to a telephone line so that a valid inquiry can be received and
identified, and coded signals containing the current register
count information can be sent out over the telephone line.
Thus, one telephone line handles information from a number of
machines. Periodically the central data processing location
can poll each of the customer sites and request telephone
transmission of an office machine count information in this
way.

The transmission link from each individual office machine to
the concentrator registers may take many different forms. It
could be a pair of light wires, a coaxial cable or a low power
radio link. A preferred embodiment would be to use known
carrier current signals operating over the customer's internal
electrical power distribution system. The data transmission
rate can be low enough to avoid noise or interference, and use
repetition and count checking techniques to insure accuracy.
For example, the concentrator registers may respond with a
common signal on all lines whenever an impulse is received and
recorded. In this way, a simple receiving circuit in each

Volume 3 Number 3 May/June 1978 193

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