Browse Prior Art Database

CONTROLLED CRYSTAL GROWTH IMAGING PROCESS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000023660D
Original Publication Date: 1978-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 251K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Delayed tack adhesive material, typically crystalline organic compositions, are characterized by their ability to remain in a tacky, supercooled ,metastable state for a period of time (open time) after activation. Open time is determined by crystal growth which returns the material to its non-tacky structured state. A typical crystalline orgaaic compound for use in this process is diphenyl phthalate.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

CONTROLLED CRYSTAL GROWTH Proposed Classification
IMAGING PROCESS U.S. Cl, 355/9
Christopher Snelling mt. Cl. G03g 15/00

Delayed tack adhesive material, typically crystalline organic
compositions, are characterized by their ability to remain in
a tacky, supercooled ,metastable state for a period of time
(open time) after activation. Open time is determined by
crystal growth which returns the material to its non~tacky
structured state. A typical crystalline orgaaic compound for
use in this process is diphenyl phthalate.

This proposal is directed to a method of generating latent
tack images for subsequent decoration with colorants or func~
tional materials by controlling "seeding" of the crystal
growth process of the delayed tack adhesive materials.

For direct optical inputs, the process requires "seeding" in
radiation (light) struck areas of a receptor. While direct
optical seeding for tack control has not yet been successfully
demonstrated, one model exists in the case of photosensitive
glasses in which colloidal metal particles are produced image~
wise to nucleate crystallization of supersaturated phases.
Another approach uses frost deformation as a mechanical
seeding technique.

Two seeding techniques have, been successfully carried out.
Smoke particle precipitation by corona onto an activated delay
tack adhesive and mechanical touching of an activated surface
with a rubber stamp have both been shown to initiate crystal
growth selectively causing generation o...