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Pumped Fluid Spreaders for Hot Spot and System Cooling in Mobile Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000023813D
Publication Date: 2004-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that uses a pumped liquid metal loop embedded in a thin metal plate to cool hot-spots in mobile device applications. Benefits include a solution that is thin, light, and allows for lower casing temperatures and better thermal performance.

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Pumped Fluid Spreaders for Hot Spot and System Cooling in Mobile Devices

Disclosed is a method that uses a pumped liquid metal loop embedded in a thin metal plate to cool hot-spots in mobile device applications. Benefits include a solution that is thin, light, and allows for lower casing temperatures and better thermal performance.

Background

Conventional spreaders use a thick copper or aluminum plate; the plate is heavy and limited in its ability to carry heat over large distances (see Figure 1).

General Description

The disclosed method consists of a pumped liquid loop embedded in a thin metal plate
(i.e. a Electro-Magneto Hydrodynamic Pump pumping the liquid metal or a mechanical pump pumping water or some other fluid). The fluid helps spread the temperature uniformly (see Figure 2).

The disclosed method can also be used for cooling memory doors, multiple discrete ICs, and as a fin for enhancing the active cooling of computer components. It can also be used for uniformly spreading energy on the bottom or top casing of a mobile computer, to reduce bottom or top temperatures and hot-spots in the notebook casing.

Advantages

The disclosed method’s pumped liquid loop based spreader is thin, light, and can carry heat over a long distance without a substantial loss in temperature.

Fig. 1

Fig. 2

Disclosed anonymously