Browse Prior Art Database

LEAD-IN BAFFLE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000023850D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 224K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In order to produce xerographic copies with a low level of blur, it is necessary to maintain the paper in contact with the photoreceptor throughout the transfer region during the transfer of the developed image to the copy paper. This has been

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~XD~SCLOSUREJOURNAL

LEAD-IN BAFFLE Proposed Classification

1 William Ladrigan U.S~CL 355/3TR

mt. Cl. G03g 15/00

In order to produce xerographic copies with a low level of blur, it is necessary to maintain the paper in contact with the photoreceptor throughout the transfer region during the transfer of the developed image to the copy paper. This has been

accomplished in the past by using a metal lead-in baffle. For the lead-in baffle to be effective, however, it must be spaced approximately .015 inches from the photoreceptor surface. In this position, there is a likelihood of photoreceptor

damage occurring as a result of contact between the photoreceptor due to photoreceptor drum runout or misadjustment of the baffle.

To prevent this damage, it is suggested that the edge of the baffle adjacent the photoreceptor be fabricated from a usoft~materiaL The material could be similar to that used in cleaning blades. A second method would be to coat the edge of the baffle with Teflon or other appropriate material having a low coefficient of friction, a high abrasion resistance and which would not result in excessive triboelectric charging of the photoreceptor upon contact therewith. A third

method would be to use a lead-in baffle equipped with rollers on the leading edge to constrain the copy paper to the photoreceptor surface. The rollers could be

fabricated from soft material, such as polyurethane, so that contact between the rollers and the photoreceptor would not resul...