Browse Prior Art Database

SELF-ADJUSTING PRELOAD MECHANISM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000023901D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 232K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In many high-speedprinting devices, the carriage for the printing mechanism is attached to a motor driven cables In these high-speeddevices, the carriage must be moved rapidly and positioned accurately by the cables Long term stretching of the cable, - due to fatigue, allows the cable to become slack affecting positional accuracy- The drawing shows a structure designed to maintain a constant cable tension even though the cable were to stretch- A block of high friction material 1, such as a bushing material, is held in place by a normal load spring 2- This holds the preload spring 3 in place, which in turn keeps a constant preload on the cable 4. Should the cable 4 stretch, the preload spring 3 will force the friction block 1 back regaining close to the same preload tension on the cable as there was prior to cable stretching.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

5ELF~AD3USTING PRELOAD MECHANISM Proposed Classification Svetislav Mitrovich U~S.Cl. 197/60

Inte CL B41j 19/00

3

In many high~speedprinting devices, the carriage for the printing mechanism is attached to a motor driven cables In these high-~speeddevices, the carriage must be moved rapidly and positioned accurately by the cables Long term stretching of the cable, ~ due to fatigue, allows the cable to become slack affecting positional accuracy~ The drawing shows a structure designed to maintain a constant cable tension even though the cable were to stretch~ A block of high friction material 1, such as a bushing material, is held in place by a normal load spring 2~ This holds the preload spring 3 in place, which in turn keeps a constant preload on the cable 4. Should the cable 4 stretch, the preload spring 3 will force the friction block 1 back regaining close to the same preload tension on the cable as there was prior to cable stretching.

Volume 4 Number 2 March/April 1979 177

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