Browse Prior Art Database

FOAM ROLL PHOTORECEPTOR CLEANER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024028D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 387K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In electrophotographic copying, it is generally desirable to remove residual toner particles from the surface of the photoconductor after the toner powder image has been transferred to a suitable substrate, such as a sheet of paper. Various cleaning devices are well known for cleaning the photoconductor element. One of the

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

FOAM ROLL PHOTORECEPTOR Proposed Classification CLEANER U.S. CL 355/15 Charles G. Scouten mt. CL G03g 21/00

In electrophotographic copying, it is generally desirable to remove residual toner particles from the surface of the photoconductor after the toner powder image has been transferred to a suitable substrate, such as a sheet of paper. Various cleaning devices are well known for cleaning the photoconductor element. One of the preferred devices for cleaning the photoreceptor element is a foam roller. Foam rubber cleaning rollers and related cleaning elements for cleaning the surface of a photoreceptor are described on page 111 of the September/October 1977 Xerox Disclosure journal (Volume 2, No. 5) and on pages 353 and 354 of the September/October 1978 Xerox Disclosure 3ournal (Volume 3, No. 5). However, many of the prior art foam roll cleaners are disadvantageous because they cause abrasion of the photoreceptor surface. When the prior art foam roll cleaner rotates out of the cleaner nip the foam roll contains trapped toner particles. Some of these trapped toner particles are removed during passage of the foam roller through the cleaner housing, but the more firmly trapped particles remain in the pores of the foam material as the foam rotates back into contact with the photoreceptor. Prior to entering the nip formed between the foam roll and the surface of the photoreceptor, the foam is compressed thereby expelling air and bringing trapped toner particles to the foam surface, Upon entering the nip, these particles are at the foam~photoreceptor surface interface. Because of the viscoelastic loss in the foam, peak foam~photoreceptor surface pressure is shifted from the nip center toward the point at which foam enters the nip. Thus, hard toner particles at the interface are exposed to 'the peak foam~.photoreceptor pressure and photoreceptor abrasion results. The size of the wear marks on a worn photoreceptor element suggest that most abrasion of the photoreceptor is caused by large toner particles. The high efficiency of the foam roll cleaner makes it unlikely that a significant number of large particles arrive directly at the region of peak p...