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NOVEL DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024095D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 636K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

This disclosure relates to a novel copying process that combines features of lithography, thermography and xerography. Photoreceptor drum cleaning is unnecessary because there Is 100 percent transfer of the ink similar to a lithographic process. However, the need to make a master (as In lithography) is circumvented by the use of xerographic imaging by exposing a selenium photoreceptor to a suitable image. Development of the Image occurs by a liquid development technIque simIlar to that dIsclosed by R. W. Gundlach In U.S. Patent No. 3,084,043. Thermography is used to change the viscosity of a lithographIc Ink to that resembling a liquid developer suitable for polar liquid development. Selective ink transfer in development is achieved by reducing ink cohesion force by means of the application of heat to the ink film during development to lower than the electrostatic force of the image.

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Page 1 of 4

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

NOVEL DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM ProposedEdward C. Mutschler Classification

U.S. CI. 427/31

mt. CI. B05d 1/04

F/G.J

FIG. 2

Volume 4 Number 4 July/August 1979 547

30

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 4

NOVEL DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM (Cont'd)

This disclosure relates to a novel copying process that combines features of lithography, thermography and xerography. Photoreceptor drum cleaning is unnecessary because there Is 100 percent transfer of the ink similar to a lithographic process. However, the need to make a master (as In lithography) is circumvented by the use of xerographic imaging by exposing a selenium photoreceptor to a suitable image. Development of the Image occurs by a liquid development technIque simIlar to that dIsclosed by R. W. Gundlach In U.S. Patent No. 3,084,043. Thermography is used to change the viscosity of a lithographIc Ink to that resembling a liquid developer suitable for polar liquid development. Selective ink transfer in development is achieved by reducing ink cohesion force by means of the application of heat to the ink film during development to lower than the electrostatic force of the image.

Referring to Figure 1, there is shown a schematic of the apparatus for the novel development system of the present disclosure. There is lilustrated an electrostato- graphic imaging surface, such as a rotatably mounted, cylindrical photoconductor drum 1, formed of selenium. The drum is charged at charging station A by means of a suitable corona charging system, and the drum is exposed to a light and shadow image at exposure station B. A very thin layer, for example, 0.5 to 1.5 micron of a dielectric release agent such as silicone oil, is applied over the surface of photoconductor drum 1 at station C. The silicone oil or other release agent is shown in reservoir 2 and is applied to photoconductor drum 1 by means of contact rolier 4. Doctoring of the silicone oil or other release agent is accomplished by doctor blade 5.

Development takes place in the development nip from a locally softened line of ink or liquid developer at station D. The imaged surface on photoconductor drum us developed or made visible by presenting to the surface the locally softened line of ink or liquid developer on the surface of developer dispensing member 6. Ink from reservoir 10 Is transferred to the surface of developer dispensing member 6 by a series of application roliers designated by the numeral 12. The development action and other features of the development method are described below. At station D the ink of lowered viscosity is selectively transferred electrostatically to the surface of photoconductor drum 1 bearIng a layer of silicone oil or other release agent to produce an abhesive surface. The ink immediately hardens upon the surface of photoconductor drum I and is completely transferred to a suitable substrate 14 at transfer station E where idler rolier 36 holds substate 14 in transfer p...