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Browse Prior Art Database

ERASE WITH APPLIED ELECTRIC FIELD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024123D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 242K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Following the full xerographic cycle of charge, expose, development, fusing and transfer, it is necessary to erase any residual charges remaining on the photoreceptor. This can be done by illuminating the photoreceptor with a discharge

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

ERASE WITH APPLIED ELECTRIC FIELD Proposed Classification ~Füce W. Friday~ U.S. Cl. 250/325

Int. CL HOlt 19/04

22 j22~

P/c /2

ERASE

/6

VOLTAGE

Following the full xerographic cycle of charge, expose, development, fusing and transfer, it is necessary to erase any residual charges remaining on the photoreceptor. This can be done by illuminating the photoreceptor with a discharge

lamp thereby causing conduction and dissipation of the charges. This discharge does not occur instantaneously, however, but rather depends upon such factors as charge carrier mobility and more importantly, the electric field of the charge

which is actually being neutralized. There is thus present a finite time during which the photoreceptor continues to decay following illumination. If the recharging commences during this continuing decay period, some of the charge current must be used to remove the remaining excess charge reducing charging efficiency. If the charging step is initiated only after the ~majority~' of carrier has been swept away, the charging device would have to be located at a substantially

downstream position, which is usually undesirable because of restricted space

requirements.

In the figure is shown a more efficient erase device. Erase lamp 10 illuminates a photoconductor 12 through a transparent electrode 14 biased by voltage source 16.

Curves 18 and 20 represent plots of photoreceptor charge voltage dissipation as a function of time in the prese...