Browse Prior Art Database

ADDITION OF ANTIOXIDANTS TO RELEASE FLUIDS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024183D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 106K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

This disclosure relates to a method for improving the thermal stability of release fluids and more particularly, to a method for improving the thermal stability of release agents used upon fuser rolls for releasing toner from the surface of the heated fuser roll.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

ADDITION OF ANTIOXIDANTS TO RELEASE FLUIDS ~~~~
Charles Scouten

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 252/397 Int. Cl. C09k 15/00

This disclosure relates to a method for improving the thermal stability of release fluids and more particularly, to a method for improving the thermal stability of release agents used upon fuser rolls for releasing toner from the surface of the heated fuser roll.

In xerography, toner particles can be fused to a substrate by contacting the toner particles upon the substrate with a heated fuser member bearing a coating of release material. Various fuser members as well as release fluids are well known in the art. For example, fuser rolls can be coated with Teflon, Viton, silicone rubber and the like, or the fuser member can be one having a bare metal surface as described in United States Patent 3,937,637 (Teflon and Viton are trademarks of E.
I. duPont deNemours and Company). In addition, such fuser members are generally coated with a release fluid to promote the release of toner from the heated surface of the fuser member. Common release fluids include silicone oil, hydrocarbon release agents such as pol ye thylene, polypropylene, polybutylene and poly- isobutylene, and various polymer materials having functional groups such as mercapt o-f unctional polyorganosiloxane.

Since fuser members are generally subjected to substantially high heats (for example, up to about 200 degrees centigrade), there is a tendency for many of the release fluids to undergo' oxidative degradation. Oxidative degradation of silicone oil leads to the formation of both resinous materials which can contaminate the f user member and low molecular weight polysiloxane fractions which evaporate from the heated fuser member and condense causing contamination problems in other parts of a copier apparatus. Hydrocarbon release agents, such as polyethylenes, are also susceptible to thermal oxidation which in certain cases retards...