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CONDUCTIVE POLYMER HAVING IMPROVED ELECTRICAL LIFE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024224D
Original Publication Date: 1979-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 104K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

The electrical characteristics of conductive polymers can be controlled by various methods. In one method described in U.S. Patent 3,959,574, an ionic additive (such as organic dyes, organic pigments, organic salts, polyelectolytes, inorganic salts, plasticizers, inorganic pigments, metallic particles and charge transfer complexes) is incorporated in the polymer to control the resistivity. In another method described in U.S. Patent 4,116,894, the electrical life of certain copolymers having solubilized conductivity control agents incorporated therein is enhanced by varying specified quantities of terminally unsaturated hydrocarbon nitriles in the co-polymers. For example, a butadiene copolymer having from about 1% by weight to about 12% by weight acrylonitrile in the copolymer composition in the presence of a conductivity control agent has improved electrical life and polymer stability. However, after a conductive polymer is subjected to continuous electrical use, the resistivity of the polymer increases especially when ionic additives are used as conductivity control agents. This presumably occurs because of the depletion of ionic charge carriers.

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CEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

CONDUCTIVE POLYMER HAVING IMPROVED ELECTRICAL LIFE Clifford 0. Eddy

George J. Safford

The electrical characteristics of conductive polymers can be controlled by various methods. In one method described in U.S. Patent 3,959,574, an ionic additive (such as organic dyes, organic pigments, organic salts, polyelectolytes, inorganic salts, plasticizers, inorganic pigments, metallic particles and charge transfer complexes) is incorporated in the polymer to control the resistivity. In another method described in U.S. Patent 4,116,894, the electrical life of certain copolymers having solubilized conductivity control agents incorporated therein is enhanced by varying specified quantities of terminally unsaturated hydrocarbon nitriles in the co- polymers. For example, a butadiene copolymer having from about 1% by weight to about 12% by weight acrylonitrile in the copolymer composition in the presence of a conductivity control agent has improved electrical life and polymer stability. However, after a conductive polymer is subjected to continuous electrical use, the resistivity of the polymer increases especially when ionic additives are used as conductivity control agents. This presumably occurs because of the depletion of ionic charge carriers.

Under operating conditions as in the xerographic devices described in U.S. Patent 4,058,879, the electrical stress is generally cyclic so that an ionic material that would move in a field but would tend to return to its original position when the field is removed should have a long electrical life in the polymer. The restoring force could depend upon the tendency of large, more or less linear molecules to assume a random coil shape.

In accordance with the present disclosure, a small quantity of polymer or copolymer used as the conductive polymer is converted to a quaternary ammonium compound and then incorporated into additional polymer or copolyme...