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CABLE HARNESS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024262D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Feb-29
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A cable harness 10 is originally fabricated in a serpentine pattern and extendable into linear length. The harness 10 comprises a plurality of conductors 16 formed on at least one side of an insulative substrate 12 by using conventional photolitho-graphic techniques. Conductors 16 have connector pads 18 formed at their ends on harness extensions 20. The serpentine pattern on the harness forms one or more U-shaped sections 28 each comprising two leg portions 30 integral with an end portion 32. The cable harness 10 may be rendered generally linear by means of two basic folds. One set of folds is defined by a line 34 at the point of integral connection of each leg portion 30 to its end portion 32. The second set of folds is defined by a line 36, 38 or 44, 46 commencing at an inside terminus 40 of slot 24 and extending at an angle of 45 degrees relative to line 34 in the plane of the substrate 12. The second set of folds may be in the plane of the leg portions 30 as shown in Figure I at 36, 38 or in the plane of the end portions 32 as shown in Figure 2 at 44, 46. A linear cable harness can, therefore, be fabricated within the limited confines of conventional photolithographic exposure frames.

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CEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

CABLE HARNESS Proposed David D. Thornburg Classification

U.S. C1. 339/17 F Int. C1. H05k 1/00

A cable harness 10 is originally fabricated in a serpentine pattern and extendable into linear length. The harness 10 comprises a plurality of conductors 16 formed on at least one side of an insulative substrate 12 by using conventional photolitho- graphic techniques. Conductors 16 have connector pads 18 formed at their ends on harness extensions 20. The serpentine pattern on the harness forms one or more U-
shaped sections 28 each comprising two leg portions 30 integral with an end portion
32. The cable harness 10 may be rendered generally linear by means of two basic folds. One set of folds is defined by a line 34 at the point of integral connection of each leg portion 30 to its end portion 32. The second set of folds is defined by a line 36, 38 or 44, 46 commencing at an inside terminus 40 of slot 24 and extending at an angle of 45 degrees relative to line 34 in the plane of the substrate 12. The second set of folds may be in the plane of the leg portions 30 as shown in Figure I at 36, 38 or in the plane of the end portions 32 as shown in Figure 2 at 44, 46. A linear cable harness can, therefore, be fabricated within the limited confines of conventional photolithographic exposure frames.

Volume 5 Number 1 January/February 1980 67

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   XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 5 Number 1 Janu...