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FABRICATION METHOD FOR ELECTROGRAPHIC STYLUS ELECTRODE HEAD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024290D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

An electrographic stylus electrode head 10 is manufactured by fabricating, via photolithographic techniques, on one side of a copper-cladded, epoxy glass circuit board 11 an etched parallel pattern of conductive connection rails 18. A connector finger pattern 14 is formed on the opposite side of the board 11 with a set of plated through holes 22 being provided from each connector finger 20 to the rail side of the board. The rails 18 are connected to the plated through holes 22.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

FABRICATION METHOD FOR ELECTRO- GRAPHIC STYLUS ELECTRODE HEAD Keith E. McFarland

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 29/624 Int. Cl. HOlb 13/00

William A. Lloyd
David D. Thornburg
Wendell C. Johnson

24

An electrographic stylus electrode head 10 is manufactured by fabricating, via photolithographic techniques, on one side of a copper-cladded, epoxy glass circuit board 11 an etched parallel pattern of conductive connection rails 18. A connector finger pattern 14 is formed on the opposite side of the board 11 with a set of plated through holes 22 being provided from each connector finger 20 to the rail side of the board. The rails 18 are connected to the plated through holes 22.

The rail side of the board 11 is then coated with a dry film photoresist layer. This layer is exposed and developed to form a diagonal array of holes 16 to provide a means of electrical connection between the rails 18 and subsequently formed conductor lines 12. The choice of a suitable dry film photoresist affords an opportunity to combine a photoresist and dielectric film deposition process as a single step. The photoresist acts both as an insulator for the rails 18 and a pattern vehicle for the holes 16.

The dielectric layer is then coated with another thick layer of dry film photoresist which is exposed and developed to produce a parallel groove pattern, with each formed groove being centered over a hole 16 in the hole array fabricated in the previous step.

A suitabl...