Browse Prior Art Database

LOW-VOLTAGE ELECTROGRAPHIC RECORDING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024371D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Electrostatic electrography, as it is commonly practised, requires that the voltage of incoming signals be sufficiently high to be capable of producing corona pulses at the surface of conductive styli in contact with a dielectric recording member. Signals at voltages in excess of 4 kV are required for ion formation and transport across a small air gap. The recording method of this disclosure permits electrographic recording at voltages sufficiently low that they can be delivered by solid-state devices such as, for example, CCD arrays.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

LOW-VOLTAGE ELECTROGRAPHIC RECORDING
John W. Weigl

Proposed Classification
U.S. CI. 355/12 Int. CI. G03g 15/00

Electrostatic electrography, as it is commonly practised, requires that the voltage of incoming signals be sufficiently high to be capable of producing corona pulses at the surface of conductive styli in contact with a dielectric recording member. Signals at voltages in excess of 4 kV are required for ion formation and transport across a small air gap. The recording method of this disclosure permits electrographic recording at voltages sufficiently low that they can be delivered by solid-state devices such as, for example, CCD arrays.

The electrographic recording sheet 1 consists of two layers: a photoconductive layer 2 and a dielectric layer 3, which move in the direction shown by arrow 4. The sheet is illuminated at either a line or a point by a beam of ultraviolet radiation 5 focused by lens 6 at the location where the signal is to be applied. By means of this irradiation, the bulk of the photoconductive layer such as, for example, a highly pigmented ZnO or Ti0 binder layer, is rendered temporarily conductive, and the surface is able to accgpt electric charge injected from a metal stylus pulsed to a positive signal polarity. Simultaneously, conductive toner of either dry or liquid form is induced toward the dielectric surface from a conductive applicator 8 biased suitably by power supply 9. The developed image is then transfer...