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Browse Prior Art Database

RASTER SCANNER ALIGNMENT TECHNIQUE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024379D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Both the sagittal (in the Y-direction) and tangential (in the X-direction) misalignments between the scanning arrays of a raster scanner can be overcome by properly choosing the array offsets along the Y-axis for the former and the bit offset(s) along the X-axis for the latter. This can be accomplished using a test document or fixed targets at the perimeter of the viewing platen, specifically designed for misalignment adjustments and an initialization routine. During initialization, the scanner reads the input; i.e., the test document and determines the necessary offsets via a software routine. This calibration procedure could be done throughout the day to compensate for any thermal or vibrational shifts in the raster scanner.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

RASTER SCANNER ALIGNMENT TECHNIQUE
Martin A. Agulnek

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 358/285 Int. C1. H04n 1/04

8

Volume 5 Number 3 May/June 1980 30 1

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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RASTER SCANNER ALIGNMENT TECHNIQUE (Cont'd)

Both the sagittal (in the Y-direction) and tangential (in the X-direction) misalignments between the scanning arrays of a raster scanner can be overcome by properly choosing the array offsets along the Y-axis for the former and the bit offset(s) along the X-axis for the latter. This can be accomplished using a test document or fixed targets at the perimeter of the viewing platen, specifically designed for misalignment adjustments and an initialization routine. During initialization, the scanner reads the input; i.e., the test document and determines the necessary offsets via a software routine. This calibration procedure could be done throughout the day to compensate for any thermal or vibrational shifts in the raster scanner.

A test document 5 to permit calibration of the scanning arrays in a raster scanner in both the sagittal and tangential directions is shown in the drawing. Test document 5 includes a sagittal misalignment pattern in the form of a series of black horizontal bars 6 across the full field of view of the scanning arrays. The spacings 7 between bars 6 are non-uniform so not to correlate with the sampling interval. Data from all the scanning arrays is collected sim...