Browse Prior Art Database

SURFACE COATING TO IMPROVE FUSING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024403D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

It is known in the electrostatographic reproduction art that in order for toner image to be well fixed onto a substrate, that substrate must have certain desirable properties, such as smoothness, porosity, etc. Examples of unsuitable substrate materials include certain plastics and metal substrates. In addition, certain paper and textiles which have been very densely sized will also not adhere well to a toner image.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 96% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

SURFACE COATING TO IMPROVE FUSING Proposed Alp T. Akman Classification

U.S. Cl. 118 Int. C1. B05c

It is known in the electrostatographic reproduction art that in order for toner image to be well fixed onto a substrate, that substrate must have certain desirable properties, such as smoothness, porosity, etc. Examples of unsuitable substrate materials include certain plastics and metal substrates. In addition, certain paper and textiles which have been very densely sized will also not adhere well to a toner image.

The present invention provides a method for treating such unsatisfactory substrates so that they will be adherent to a toner image. In accordance with this invention, such substrates are treated with a coating of a low-melt material on which a toner image will satisfactorily adhere.

As a specific example, a toner image does not fix well on label cloth, a starch pigment saturated cloth, because the toner particles will not wet or adhere to the very densely sized surface. In accordance with the present invention, a 5.8 mils thick label cloth was coated with a 5% ethanol solution of a polyvinyl acetate resin available from the Monsanto Company under its trade designation Gelva C3 V-10, which was coated onto the cloth with 0 Number 0 Meyer rod. The coated cloth was found to be an excellent surface for receiving and holding a toner image. An adherent toner image was formed on the coated cloth by fusing.

Volume 5 Number 4 July/August 19...