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LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAY WITH POWER AMPLIFICATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024433D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Projection displays with high resolution and good contrast are known which utilize a layer of smectic liquid crystal addressed by a scanned laser beam. These have limited speed, however, because of the thermal power required to produce a change of state in the liquid crystal medium. It is the purpose of this disclosure to teach a similar display device capable of operating with very much greater writing speed.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAY WITH

POWER AM PLIFIC AT10 N

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Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 350/342 Int. C1. G02f 1/13

Projection displays with high resolution and good contrast are known which utilize a layer of smectic liquid crystal addressed by a scanned laser beam. These have limited speed, however, because of the thermal power required to produce a change of state in the liquid crystal medium. It is the purpose of this disclosure to teach a similar display device capable of operating with very much greater writing speed.

The improved liquid crystal display device comprises a sandwich structure which includes two outer glass plates 1 and 2 , respectively, coated on their inner surface with transparent electrodes 3 and 4. In contact with electrode 3 is a photoconductive layer 5 bearing reflecting metal film 6 on its opposite side. Liquid crystal material 7 fills the area between the photoconductor 5 and glass plate 2 and is contained by end plates 8 and 9. When switch 10 is closed, DC source 11 is connected across electrode 3 and metal film 6 to provide a potential drop across the photoconductor 5. Contacts 12 and 13 connected to metal film 6 and electrode 4 across the liquid crystal material may be connected to a suitable AC voltage for erasing an image.

Volume 5 Number 4 July/August 1980 409

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Benjamin Kazan

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