Browse Prior Art Database

FLYING APERTURE READING SCHEME WITH FIBER OPTIC DELAY LINES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024448D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is an improvement to a flying aperture reading scheme whereby multiple apertures are utilized in a signal enhancement scheme that circumvents the limitations inherent in a single aperture system in which the speed of operation may be limited by the radiance available from a sheet of paper and the fact that the aperture "dwell time" on reading a point is very short. The scheme involves detecting each spot several times (by using a number of apertures) and adding the outputs with suitable time delays so as to make the various detections of each spot time coincident. By this method the effective signal-to-noise ratio for a given scan rate could be increased due to the coherent signal addition. In order to produce the needed delays, each aperture has behind it an optical fiber, which provides a delay complementary to that introduced by the scanning system, all fibers going to a single detector.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

FLYING APERTURE READING SCHEME WITH FIBER OPTIC DELAY LINES
G. H. S. Rokos

Proposed Classification
U.S. Cl. 358/200 Int. Cl. H04n 3/02

Disclosed is an improvement to a flying aperture reading scheme whereby multiple apertures are utilized in a signal enhancement scheme that circumvents the limitations inherent in a single aperture system in which the speed of operation may be limited by the radiance available from a sheet of paper and the fact that the aperture "dwell time" on reading a point is very short. The scheme involves detecting each spot several times (by using a number of apertures) and adding the outputs with suitable time delays so as to make the various detections of each spot time coincident. By this method the effective signal-to-noise ratio for a given scan rate could be increased due to the coherent signal addition. In order to produce the needed delays, each aperture has behind it an optical fiber, which provides a delay complementary to that introduced by the scanning system, all fibers going to a single detector.

Volume 5 Number 4 July/August 1980 449

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]