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IMAGING PROCESS USING PHOTO-POLYMERIZABLE COMPOUND

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024457D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A process for reprographic printing on plain paper in whid-r a thin layer of photopolymerizable liquid is coated onto the paper surface and then exposed to a visible light image so that exposed portions of the layer are hardened by polymerization and unexposed (image) portions are not. The image is then developed by brushing with toner particles which adhere to the unpolymerized areas. Subsequent polymerization; e.g., in daylight, slowly fixes the image.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 430/144 Int. C1. G03c 5/24


M. Hemming

A process for reprographic printing on plain paper in whid-r a thin layer of photopolymerizable liquid is coated onto the paper surface and then exposed to a visible light image so that exposed portions of the layer are hardened by polymerization and unexposed (image) portions are not. The image is then developed by brushing with toner particles which adhere to the unpolymerized areas. Subsequent polymerization; e.g., in daylight, slowly fixes the image.

In an example of the process, a layer of a photopolymerizable composition comprising a polymerizable and crosslinkable monomer, trimethylol propane triacrylate, containing rose bengal and hydrazine was coated onto plain paper. An image was formed in the layer by illumination thorugh a transparency using a 500 watt tungsten filament lamp. Thus, the layer was hardened except where the transparency prevented illumination. Magnetic toner particles brushed onto the layer then adhered to the unexposed portions of the image permanently, polymerization in daylight fusing the image slowly. Particles on the initially hardened parts of the layer were blown off.

Volume 5 Number 4 July/August 1980 469

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