Browse Prior Art Database

LASER CUTTING METHODS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024458D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is the use of a laser beam of any suitable wattage for the purpose of eliminating or drastically reducing edge bleeding; that is, discoloration, and for eliminating and drastically reducing edge dusting when, for example, carbonless sheets are cut. Presently, the mechanical cutting of carbonless sheets causes rupturing of the color forming capsules coated on the sheets, which produced visible edge discoloration extending inward from the edge to a distance of from up to 5 to 10 millimeters. This distracts from the appearance of the sheets and can also produce non-functional imaging in the edge areas when such sheets are used in electrophotographic imaging systems. A further problem associated with mech-anical cutting is edge dust, which, in turn, adversely affects the copying machine components within which the paper is being used for forming images thereon.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

LASER CUTTING METHODS George Treier
Frank J. Wolf

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 430/644 Int. C1. G03c 1/02

Disclosed is the use of a laser beam of any suitable wattage for the purpose of eliminating or drastically reducing edge bleeding; that is, discoloration, and for eliminating and drastically reducing edge dusting when, for example, carbonless sheets are cut. Presently, the mechanical cutting of carbonless sheets causes rupturing of the color forming capsules coated on the sheets, which produced visible edge discoloration extending inward from the edge to a distance of from up to 5 to 10 millimeters. This distracts from the appearance of the sheets and can also produce non-functional imaging in the edge areas when such sheets are used in electrophotographic imaging systems. A further problem associated with mech- anical cutting is edge dust, which, in turn, adversely affects the copying machine components within which the paper is being used for forming images thereon.

In one embodiment, a laser beam of 500 watts at a speed of 600 feet per minute was employed.

The method described can also be used for cutting ground wood papers, sensitized dielectric papers and electroresistive papers resulting in some of the same advantages described hereinbefore. Also, with the sensitized dielectric and electroresistive papers any damage to the functional coatings or the surface of these papers is substantially eliminated.

In another embodiment,...