Browse Prior Art Database

VARIABLE HIGH VOLTAGE SOURCE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024472D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

This disclosure relates to a variable, controllable source of high voltage DC power which derives its input from a lower voltage high frequency supply. The design enables low cost of manufacture and long operating 1ife.because a transformer of reduced voltage is used, and the components are stressed less than those of a conventional power source. A unique feature of the present design is that the high voltage DC level falls to zero when the output is zero. One application for which the power source is suitable is in a feedback electrometer.

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(EROX DIĀ§CLOSURE JOURNAL

VARIABLE HIGH VOLTAGE SOURCE
Proposed R. F. Buckheit Classification

U.S. Cl. 324/72 Int. C1. GOlr 31/02

HIGH FREQUENCY AC INPUT

T

CONTROL

I NPUT

CONTROL

INPUT

HIGH VOCTACE NEGATIVE DC OUTPUT

T

I NPU

T

-HIGH WTqE

DC CU U EITHER POUWITY

This disclosure relates to a variable, controllable source of high voltage DC power which derives its input from a lower voltage high frequency supply. The design enables low cost of manufacture and long operating 1ife.because a transformer of reduced voltage is used, and the components are stressed less than those of a conventional power source. A unique feature of the present design is that the high voltage DC level falls to zero when the output is zero. One application for which the power source is suitable is in a feedback electrometer.

In Figures 1 and 2, Dl and D2 are light-emitting diodes activated by the control

input signal, and R1 and R2 are photoresistive cells which are optically coupled to

the light-emitting diodes D1 and D2, respectively. Figure 1 shows the circuit

connected as a voltage doubler providing negative output, however, it could also be

connected as a cascaded multiplier of N stages, giving N-fold voltage multipli-

cation. Figure 2 shows an arrangement providing either positive or negative

output. In Figures 1 and 2, the high frequency input could, for example, be 400

volts RMS at 4000 Hz. In this case, the corresponding output of the Figure 1

circuit would be from zero to -1000 VDC...