Browse Prior Art Database

INTEGRATED OPTICAL CONTROL CIRCUIT FOR XEROGRAPHIC ENGINES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024477D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In order to control the operation of future copier-duplicators, many sensors will be provided to monitor operations and provide signals to devices which initiate the requisite control actions. For electrical sensors to operate reliably in the electrically "noisytf environment of a xerographic engine, extensive signal con-ditioning and redundancy must be provided in the multiplexer and computer. The problems and cost inherent in such systems can be avoided by the use of optical sensors and light-conducting fibers in place of electrical sensors and electrically conductive wires.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

INTEGRATED OPTICAL CONTROL CIRCUIT FOR XEROGRAPHIC ENGINES
Esther M. Conwell
David E. Damouth

Proposed Classification

US. Cl. 350/96.12

Int. Cl. C02b 5/14

In order to control the operation of future copier-duplicators, many sensors will be provided to monitor operations and provide signals to devices which initiate the requisite control actions. For electrical sensors to operate reliably in the electrically "noisytf environment of a xerographic engine, extensive signal con- ditioning and redundancy must be provided in the multiplexer and computer. The problems and cost inherent in such systems can be avoided by the use of optical sensors and light-conducting fibers in place of electrical sensors and electrically conductive wires.

Multiplexing can be accomplished by coupling individual fibers into a waveguiding channel on an elastomer, then allowing each channel to transmit briefly in sequence by application of blocking electric fields across the elastomers, the output activating a photodetector.

Multiplexing could also be accomplished by using piezoelectric organics such as
polyvinylidene fluoride. These materials also block light when addressed by an electric field. Still another alternative is to use channels made of sputtered glass partially covered with a nematic liquid crystal. In this configuration, TE or TM modes of light wave propagation within the glass waveguide channels may be suppressed. A final alternative is the controlling...