Browse Prior Art Database

DETECTION OF CRACKED DICOROTRON WIRE COATINGS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024481D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is a system and method for detection of cracked glass coated dicorotron wires similar to the dicorotron disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,086,650. Visual detection of such cracks is not easy, yet the existence of those cracks along the length of the dicorotron wire can produce copy defects. A technique for discovering the location of cracks along the wire which has proven particularly effective is to scan along the length of a grounded dicorotron coronode with a high frequency discharge generator such as a Tesla Coil. Cracks are immediately visible since the discharge generator creates an easily observable bright spot on the glass coating at the site of the crack. In order to implement the detection technique in the field, it is necessary that one end of the coronode be grounded and that a high frequency, high voltage lead and probe such as the Tesla Coil be available to scan the length of the dicorotron. The source of the energy for the probe can be conventional 110 volt line voltage, or alternatively, the probe could be coupled to one of the dicorotron alternating current power supplies.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

DETECTION OF CRACKED DICOROTRON WIRE COATINGS U.S. C1. 355/3CH Dona1

Proposed Classification

d Seanor Int. C1. G03g 15/00

Disclosed is a system and method for detection of cracked glass coated dicorotron wires similar to the dicorotron disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,086,650. Visual detection of such cracks is not easy, yet the existence of those cracks along the length of the dicorotron wire can produce copy defects. A technique for discovering the location of cracks along the wire which has proven particularly effective is to scan along the length of a grounded dicorotron coronode with a high frequency discharge generator such as a Tesla Coil. Cracks are immediately visible since the discharge generator creates an easily observable bright spot on the glass coating at the site of the crack. In order to implement the detection technique in the field, it is necessary that one end of the coronode be grounded and that a high frequency, high voltage lead and probe such as the Tesla Coil be available to scan the length of the dicorotron. The source of the energy for the probe can be conventional 110 volt line voltage, or alternatively, the probe could be coupled to one of the dicorotron alternating current power supplies.

Volume 5 Number 5 September/October 1980 523

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    XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 5 Number 5 September/October 1980

524

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