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DISTRIBUTED HIGH VOLTAGE SWITCH

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024505D
Original Publication Date: 1980-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A high voltage - low current switch capable of operating at speeds up to IOKHz is made by a process resulting in a randomly oriented distribution of switch elements in the form of diodes, diode pairs or transistors. The switch elements which happen to line up in the direction of reverse current flow act as working photosensitive switches. The oppositely positioned elements would be forward conductors, and the laterally positioned elements would be ineffective. Since the switch consists of many switch elements in series, each switch element need be rated for only a small voltage.

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DISTRIBUTED HIGH VOLTAGE SWITCH Proposed Halsey P. Quinn Classification

US. Cl. 291572 Int: Cl. HOlc 7/08

A high voltage - low current switch capable of operating at speeds up to IOKHz is made by a process resulting in a randomly oriented distribution of switch elements in the form of diodes, diode pairs or transistors. The switch elements which happen to line up in the direction of reverse current flow act as working photosensitive switches. The oppositely positioned elements would be forward conductors, and the laterally positioned elements would be ineffective. Since the switch consists of many switch elements in series, each switch element need be rated for only a small voltage.

The process is initiated by the formation of a silicon wafer doped to provide a diode, a pair of bad< to back diodes or a transistor. The wafer is then pulverized into small pieces, each of which would be one switch element. All of the switch elements are mixed with a binder and spread over an area of an insulating substrate and compressed while the binder cures to insure electrical contact between the individual switch elements. Thus, the finished switch would consist of a randomly oriented distribution of switch elements.

Since all of the switch elements come from the same wafer, their electrical characteristics would tend to be equal and that would provide a uniform voltage distribution across the switch. If the switching elements were symmetrical transistors with the usual reverse...