Browse Prior Art Database

TONER THICKNESS CONTROL IN LIQUID INK DEVELOPMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024579D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In a conventional electrophotographic liquid ink deve,apment system , t. .e photo-receptor surface 10 leaves the developer 11 carrying the developed image together with a substantial layer 12 of developing fluid. In order to reduce solvent carry-out from the machine, this fluid layer is reduced to a thickness of a few microns by a toner thickness control device 13 placed immediately after the developer. The present proposal is to use a grooved roller as a toner thickness control device. The roller runs in contact with the photoreceptor 10 and, in order to avoid excessive image degradations, the surface velocities should be matched. Only that volume of the developer fluid that fills the roller grooves will pass through the roller-photoreceptor nip 14 and this will then be split between the roller and the photoreceptor.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

TONER THICKNESS CONTROL IN LIQUID INK DEVELOPMENT
K. W. Smith
P. A. Boereboom

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1. 355/10 Int. Cl. G03g 15/10

In a conventional electrophotographic liquid ink deve,apment system , t. .e photo- receptor surface 10 leaves the developer 11 carrying the developed image together with a substantial layer 12 of developing fluid. In order to reduce solvent carry-out from the machine, this fluid layer is reduced to a thickness of a few microns by a toner thickness control device 13 placed immediately after the developer. The present proposal is to use a grooved roller as a toner thickness control device. The roller runs in contact with the photoreceptor 10 and, in order to avoid excessive image degradations, the surface velocities should be matched. Only that volume of the developer fluid that fills the roller grooves will pass through the roller- photoreceptor nip 14 and this will then be split between the roller and the photoreceptor.

Volume 6 Number 1 January/February 1981 31

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    XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 6 Number 1 January/February 1981

32

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