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A METHOD FOR TAILORING THE AXIAL RADIANCE DISTRIBUTION OF A GASEOUS DISCHARGE LAMP

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024593D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

The axial radiance of a gas discharge lamp can be provided with desired profiles by introducing a recombination material such as glass wool into the arc stream of the lamp. The axial radiance can be %haped" by altering the packing density of the glass wool along the longitudinal axis of the lamp. For example, a lamp having a low density of glass wool at its center which gradually increases in density towards the ends will have a low radiance at its center and a maximum radiance at the ends. This is of considerable benefit to copier machines which use scanning lamps and/or mirrors since tracking error at the photoreceptor can be reduced by using a slit with reduced width at its ends, i.e., a straight slit instead of a butterfly slit. The exposure is also increased by the overall higher radiance which results from having placed glass wool in the lamp.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

A METHOD FOR TAILORING THE AXIAL ProDosed Classification RADIANCE DISTRIBUTION OF A GASEOUS
DISCHARGE LAMP

US: C1. 313/203 Int. C1. HOli 17/04

Richard F. Lehman

The axial radiance of a gas discharge lamp can be provided with desired profiles by introducing a recombination material such as glass wool into the arc stream of the lamp. The axial radiance can be %haped" by altering the packing density of the glass wool along the longitudinal axis of the lamp. For example, a lamp having a low density of glass wool at its center which gradually increases in density towards the ends will have a low radiance at its center and a maximum radiance at the ends. This is of considerable benefit to copier machines which use scanning lamps and/or mirrors since tracking error at the photoreceptor can be reduced by using a slit with reduced width at its ends, i.e., a straight slit instead of a butterfly slit. The exposure is also increased by the overall higher radiance which results from having placed glass wool in the lamp.

Volume 6 Number 2 March/April 1981 59

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60

  XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 6 Number 2 March/April 1981

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