Browse Prior Art Database

Method For Processing Systems Management Events that are Represented in XML

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024648D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Apr-02
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The core idea of this invention is to provide an event processing engine which takes two inputs : - an XPath statement - a collection of XML based events. The output of the event processing engine is based on the nature of the XPath statement and can be one of the following : - a group of events that match a boolean expression in the XPath statement (such as the collection of events having a certain severity) - a number which is computed by examining a property of each event (such as the total number of events that are currently in the "open" state) - a string which contains an attribute from one of the events in the entire set (such as the date of the most recent event)

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Method For Processing Systems Management Events that are Represented in XML

Modern systems management applications such as the Tivoli Enterprise Console are adopting XML as a common format for representing events. Using XML to represent events provides a significant advantage because it allows them to be externalized to third party applications and merged with other types of application data that is also represented in XML . One of the results of taking this approach is that in many cases the application code for processing events must move from stored procedures in the event database (where the event schema is reflected in the database schema) to custom application code (where the event schema is derived at runtime from XML). The obvious (and typical) approach that an application would take for processing the XML events would be to use an XML programming library such as Apache Xerces or xml4j to parse the event data into an abstract tree and then drive further processing based on the data it contains. However, taking this approach has several drawbacks, such as :

requires advanced XML programming skills, especially to maintain performance when event throughput is high does not provide a way for non-programmers to provide instructions for processing the event data the choice of programming language may limit the runtime platforms where the event can be processed does not provide a way to easily express the event processing instructions in a compact format

For example, the Tivoli Enterprise Console uses the concept of Event Groups to present a collection of events which have similar properties. The end user can define which events should be included in an Event Group by supplying part of an SQL query language to select the matching events. In order to display this Event Group the Tivoli Enterprise Console must parse the query provided by the user and then parse each XML event into an abstract tree one by one, adding it to the view if it matches the query.

The core idea of this invention is to provide an event processing engine which takes two inputs : an XPath statement
a collection of XML based events

The output of the event processing engine is based on the nature of the XPath statement and can be one of the following : a group of events that match a boolean expression in the XPath statement (such as the collection of events having a certain severity) a number which is c...