Browse Prior Art Database

MICROELECTROMETER RASTER INPUT SCANNER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024720D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 172K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A microelectrometer Raster Input Scanner (RIS) offers an opportunity for better image quality by detecting the image prior to the development step, offers a more facile architecture for a laser to provide a triple function, (i.e., RIS, Raster Output Scanning or ROS and copying), and simplifies the asynchronous transceiver op-portunities since the xerographic development subsystem need not be run in an asynchronous mode. Implementation requires focus on the following areas:

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

MICROELECTROMETER RASTER INPUT SCANNER
James C. Stoffel
Geoffrey M. Foley
Richard H. Tuhro

Proposed Classification US. Cl. 358/294
Int. C1. H04n 1/02

SELECTOR

/4 FIG 2

"I f

12

Volume 6 Number 5 September/October 1981 29 1

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MICROELECTROMETER RASTER INPUT SCANNER (Cont'd)

A microelectrometer Raster Input Scanner (RIS) offers an opportunity for better image quality by detecting the image prior to the development step, offers a more facile architecture for a laser to provide a triple function, (i.e., RIS, Raster Output Scanning or ROS and copying), and simplifies the asynchronous transceiver op- portunities since the xerographic development subsystem need not be run in an asynchronous mode. Implementation requires focus on the following areas:

1. transit times for discharge of small local areas of the photoreceptor;

2. distance requirements, photoreceptor to microelectrometer;

3. microphonics problems;

4. problems of large area capacitive sensing small, localized discharge current as well as defective current flow due to photoreceptor drum rotation, etc.; and

5. detection of design of 'Yaserless" microelectrometer RIS.

An analysis of issues 1 and 2 leads to the following conclusions:

1. Alloy photoreceptors provide sufficiently fast transit times to enable high resolution image detection without expensive deconvolution.

2. The photoreceptor to microelectrometer distance must be very small. However, a readhead may be placed on a flexible substrate which may then run in contact with the drum and exploit the electrostatic force to maintain contact and conform to the surface of the drum. Standard xerographic drum lubricants will enable long life.

Issues 3 and 4 are primarily concerned with the fundamental design of a microelectrometer.

Figure 1 shows the fundamental concept of a segmented microelectrometer 5 for use as an image pickup head, which is easily fabricated on a Mylar or equivalent substrate 6. Microelectrometer 5 is fundamentally a linear array of small capacitors 8 electrically connected through a selector switch 9 to a high impedance differential op amp 10 which then completes the circuit to the photoreceptor drum 12 of a xerographic system. Microelectrometer 5 therefore, can detect discharge current at isolated pixel regions of photoreceptor 12. By segmenting the capacitive pick-up head, a number of advantages are achieved. First, the effects of small capacitor discharge in parallel with the large area capacitor of the photoreceptor is eliminated. Secondly, the effects of photoreceptor drum rotation are localized to those of the specific pixel under investigation. Thus, for very short dwell times, errors are minimized.

    XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 6 Number 5 September/October 1981

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MICROELECTROMETER RASTER INPUT SCANNER (Cont'd)

Fabrication of the segmented microe...