Browse Prior Art Database

DOCUMENT SENSOR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000024790D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-04
Document File: 4 page(s) / 118K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Optoelectronic sensors are preferred over switches to detect documents in the paper paths of copiers and duplicators. The main advantage of these sensors is that they can detect documents without contacting them. Switches are especially a problem with lightweight papers because the paper can be misregistered, slowed down, and even damaged. Another advantage of opt0 sensors is their fast speed of response which allows a document's position to be more precisely known.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 57% of the total text.

Page 1 of 4

DOCUMENT SENSOR 355/14SH CI. U.S. Proposed James E. Chambers Classification

Int. C1. G03g 15/00

-t--

F/G. I

Volume 7 Number 1 January/February 1982 43

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 4

DOCUMENT SENSOR (Cont'd)

Optoelectronic sensors are preferred over switches to detect documents in the paper paths of copiers and duplicators. The main advantage of these sensors is that they can detect documents without contacting them. Switches are especially a problem with lightweight papers because the paper can be misregistered, slowed down, and even damaged. Another advantage of opt0 sensors is their fast speed of response which allows a document's position to be more precisely known.

An optoelectronic sensor, however, may be required to detect all or part of the following documents: heavyweight papers (#9 and above), lightweight papers (especially Japanese), white and colored papers, clean paper and paper with images and transparencies.

Presently, we have optoelectronic sensors, both transmissive and reflective types which will detect the heavyweight papers. These sensors will not detect light- weight papers and transparencies. The output signal of the diffuse reflective sensor could be amplified to detect lightweight paper while sacrificing response time. This sensor would still not detect transparencies and it would not detect papers with images on them. Therefore, we have opt0 sensors which will do parts of the job but none that will do it all. A special problem exists with transparencies as there is no optoelectronic sensor available to detect them.

44

    XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL Volume 7 Number 1 January/February 1982

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 4

DOCUMENT SENS...